Leading Equality and Diversity

Be able to understand the commitment to equality of opportunity and diversity 1. 1 – Evaluate the organisation’s commitment to equality of opportunity and diversity Equality and diversity means that every service user has their individual needs comprehensively addressed. He or she will be treated equally and without discrimination. This is regardless of the individual’s ethnic background, language, culture, faith, gender, age, sexual orientation or any other aspect that could result in their being discriminated against purely because they have such characteristics.

Ashley Care LLP is firmly committed to diversity in all areas of our work. We believe that we have much to learn and profit from diverse cultures, experiences and perspectives, and that diversity will make our organisation more effective in meeting the needs of all our stakeholders. We believe that equality and diversity within our organisation contributes to our objectives and we are especially conscious of the fact that effective partnership relationships require a shared commitment to equality of opportunity and valuing and managing diversity.

Our Equality and Diversity Policy helps to ensure that there is no unjustified discrimination in the recruitment, retention, training and development of staff on the basis of gender including transgender, marital status, sexual identity, religion and belief, political opinion, race, work pattern, age, disability or HIV/AIDS status, socio-economic background, spent convictions, on the basis of having or not having dependants, or any other irrelevant grounds. Our Policy is an integral way on which we handle our recruitment procedures to ensure a fair and approachable image of our organisation.

Ashley Care LLP have an Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity Policy and its purpose is to ensure that its service is fully committed to these principles and values and to communicate this commitment to all stakeholders. The policy should always be referred to wherever differences of view based on lack of understanding or prejudice about diversity, equality and inclusion are evident. Equality, diversity and inclusion means that every service user has their individual needs comprehensively addressed he or she will be treated equally and without discrimination.

This is regardless of the individual’s ethnic background, language, culture, faith, gender, age, sexual orientation or any other aspect that could result in their being discriminated against purely because they have such characteristics. 1. 2Discuss how behaviour, actions and words of all members of the organisation support the commitment to equality of opportunity and diversity At Ashley Care LLP we are committed to working together to build a community founded on equality of opportunity – a social care community which celebrates the rich diversity of our service users and staff populations.

Discriminatory behaviour has no place in our community and will not be tolerated. Within a spirit of respecting difference, our equality and diversity policies promise equal treatment and opportunity for all regardless of gender, sexuality, race, colour, disability, religion, age, and ethnicity or nationality. We call on all members of our company to make a personal commitment to these aims. Our Partners of the Company will ensure that its own actions promote equality and diversity.

Through their words and behaviours, Partners will aim to provide genuine equality of opportunity regardless of gender, sexuality, race, colour, disability, religion, age, and ethnic or national origin. In considering its own composition and filling vacancies, the Partners will seek to ensure that its membership embraces the widest possible variety of backgrounds and views, consistent with the need to maintain a Partnership with the skills and experience necessary to carry out its responsibilities. Ashley Care LLP expresses its commitment to equality and diversity by: a. especting service users’ ethnic, cultural and religious practices and making practical provision for them to be observed b. reassuring its service uses that their diverse backgrounds enhance the quality of experience of the service c. accepting service users as individuals, not as cases or stereotypes d. involving service users to express their individuality and to follow their preferred lifestyle, also helping them to celebrate events, anniversaries or festivals which are important to them as individuals e. howing positive leadership and having management and human resources practices that actively demonstrate a commitment to equality and diversity principles f. developing an ethos throughout

Ashley Care LLP that reflects these values and principles g. expecting all staff to work to equality and diversity principles and policies and to behave at all times in non-discriminatory ways h. providing, training, supervision and support to enable staff to do this i. aving a code of conduct that makes any form of discriminatory behaviour unacceptable; this is applicable to both staff and service users and is rigorously observed and monitored accordingly. Partners will devote time to the development of their own knowledge, understanding and practices to promote and achieve equality and respect for diversity and will see such development as one test of their effectiveness. The achievement of genuine equality of opportunity is at the heart of our mission as a provider of higher education.

We aim to build a learning community which exhibits the diverse range of skills and experience which cannot be found within any single group of students or staff. In pursuing this aim, we want our community to value and to be at ease with its own diversity and to reflect the needs of the wider community within which we operate. Although we accept all of our responsibilities under current legislation, we aim to reach beyond the strict confines of the law to provide equality of opportunity for all. We will continue to formulate and implement policies to that end.

Every member of our company has a moral and legal responsibility to promote equal treatment within that community and to respect its diversity. Overall responsibility for working with our community in support of these aims lies with the Senior Partner, closely supported by the other Partners. The HR & Workforce Development Manager is responsible for matters relating to equality of opportunity in employment, for developing policies which meet legislation and best practice, for monitoring the impact of these policies on different minority groups, and for providing relevant employment statistics.

All staff and service users are responsible for ensuring that their actions are carried out in accordance with this policy. They may be held personally to account should their actions fall sort of the requirements of this policy in any way. We are committed to being an equal opportunities employer. We wish to see people from all groups in our society represented at all levels of employment, to ensure that no available talent is overlooked and to provide role models for our staff members. 1. 3Identify organisational and personal responsibilities and liabilities under equality legislation and codes of practice

The Equality Act became law in October 2010. It replaces previous legislation (such as the Race Relations Act 1976 and the Disability Discrimination Act 1995) and ensures consistency in what we needed to do to make our workplace a fair environment and to comply with the law. “This was, primarily , the Equal Pay Act 1970, the Sex Discrimination Act 1975, the Race Relations Act 1976, the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and three major statutory instruments protecting discrimination in employment on grounds of religion or belief, sexual orientation and age. ” en. wikipedia. rg/wiki/Equality_Act_2010 The public sector Equality Duty (section 149 of the Act) came into force on 5 April 2011. The Equality Duty applies to public bodies and others carrying out public functions. It supports good decision-making by ensuring public bodies consider how different people will be affected by their activities, helping them to deliver policies and services which are efficient and effective; accessible to all; and which meet different people’s needs. The Equality Duty is supported by specific duties, set out in regulations which came into force on 10 September 2011.

The specific duties require public bodies to publish relevant, proportionate information demonstrating their compliance with the Equality Duty; and to set themselves specific, measurable equality objectives. The Equality Act covers the same groups that were protected by existing equality legislation – age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, marriage and civil partnership and pregnancy and maternity – it extends some protections to some of the groups not previously covered, and also strengthens particular aspects of equality law.

The Equality Act is a mixture of rights and responsibilities that have: * Stayed the same – for example, direct discrimination still occurs when “someone is treated less favourably than another person because of a protected characteristic” * Changed – for example, employees will now be able to complain of harassment even if it is not directed at them, if they can demonstrate that it creates an offensive environment for them * Been extended – for example, associative discrimination (direct discrimination against someone because they associate with another person who possesses a protected characteristic) will cover age, disability, gender reassignment and sex as well as race, religion and belief and sexual orientation Been introduced for the first time – for example, the concept of discrimination arising from disability, which occurs if a disabled person is treated unfavourably because of something arising in consequence of their disability.

As a result, I needed to review and change most of our policies and practices. 2. Be able to understand the application of equality of opportunity and diversity 2. 1 – Describe the organisation’s equality and diversity policies and how these are communicated within the workplace To ensure equality and diversity is no longer viewed as something only affecting minority groups, any issues need to be viewed not as issues, but as something to be explored and celebrated. Staff could be personally affected by stereotyping, prejudice and/or discrimination when attending work, which could lead to non attendance or non achievement.

As a manager I need to ensure all my staff value one another and that the basic rights they are entitled to, for example to learn in a comfortable and safe environment are met. The Pre-Employment Induction to Ashley Care LLP include details of all policies and procedures, including equality and diversity, which are brought to the attention of the staff members during their initial interview and during the induction session. Having a policy is not enough, Ashley Care LLP also have a working group to ensure that the policies are promoted, monitored and regularly reviewed. Policies are also communicated to all staff through the following mechanisms: * Staff handbook *

Contract of Employment * Application Form * Team meetings * Staff meetings Ashley Care LLP fully supports all principles of equality and diversity, and opposes any unfair or unlawful discrimination on the grounds of ability, age, colour, culture, disability, domestic circumstances, employment status, ethnic origin, gender, learning difficulties, marital status / civil partnership, nationality, political conviction, race, religion or belief, sexual orientation and/or social background. Ashley Care LLP aims to ensure that equality and diversity is promoted among all staff and service users and that unfair or unlawful discrimination, whether direct or indirect, is eliminated to promote a climate of equality and respect. All staff can expect to work in an environment free from harassment and bullying. ” Taken from Ashley Care LLP’s policy on Equality and Diversity 2. 2 – Assess the application of the organisation’s commitment to equality of opportunity and diversity

The evidence that Ashley Care LLP have collected over the years clearly demonstrate our commitment to equality and diversity. The application form states that “Ashley Care LLP is an equal opportunities employer and we welcome applications from all sections of the community. We are committed to a policy of equal opportunities for all work seekers and shall adhere to our policy at all times. We review all aspects of recruitment to avoid unlawful or undesirable discrimination. ” Our policy states that “Equality and diversity means that every service user has their individual needs comprehensively addressed. He or she will be treated equally and without discrimination.

This is regardless of the individual’s ethnic background, language, culture, faith, gender, age, sexual orientation or any other aspect that could result in their being discriminated against purely because they have such characteristics. ” Within our policy we also state that “Ashley Care LLP expresses its commitment to equality and diversity by: a. respecting service users’ ethnic, cultural and religious practices and making practical provision for them to be observed b. reassuring its service uses that their diverse backgrounds enhance the quality of experience of the service c. accepting service users as individuals, not as cases or stereotypes d. nvolving service users to express their individuality and to follow their preferred lifestyle, also helping them to celebrate events, anniversaries or festivals which are important to them as individuals e. showing positive leadership and having management and human resources practices that actively demonstrate a commitment to equality and diversity principles f. developing an ethos throughout Ashley

Care LLP that reflects these values and principles g. expecting all staff to work to equality and diversity principles and policies and to behave at all times in non-discriminatory ways h. providing, training, supervision and support to enable staff to do this i. aving a code of conduct that makes any form of discriminatory behaviour unacceptable; this is applicable to both staff and service users and is rigorously observed and monitored accordingly. ” 2. 3 – Review the diversity of the workforce against the local and/or national population and identify areas for review. Diversity is about valuing and respecting the differences in the workforce, regardless of ability and/or circumstances or any other individual characteristics they may have. If you have more than one member in your workforce you will experience diversity. I am also different from my workforce in many ways, and they are different from one another, therefore they are entitled to be treated with respect, with their differences taken into consideration.

Combined together, equality and diversity drive an organisation to comply with anti-discrimination legislation as well as emphasising the positive benefits of diversity such as drawing on a wider pool of talent, positively motivating all employees and meeting the needs of a wider customer base. Differences should be acknowledged, celebrated and embraced, to ensure all employees feel included in the process to be followed, and that the working environment is suitable for all. Examples of these differences are: * ability| * disability – physical or mental| * age| * domestic circumstances| * belief| * educational background| * colour| * employment status| * class| * ethnic origin| clothing worn| * experience| * confidence| * gender| * culture| * intelligence| * language, accent, dialect| * race| * learning difficulties| * religion| * marital status / civil partnership| * sexual orientation| * nationality| * social class or identity| * occupation| * talent| * parental status| * tradition| * physical characteristics| * transgender| * political conviction| * wealth| Promoting diversity in the workforce is about attracting and retaining the best people, regardless of what group they belong to.

“There is considerable evidence to show that inclusive organisations benefit from diversity through: enhanced competitiveness, attracting and retaining more competent employees, who understand the needs of their workforce and respect differences; * improved performance and outcomes, creating a working environment in which everyone is encouraged to perform to their maximum potential; * improved customer services, being able to reflect and meet the diverse needs of the workforce and; * improved staff relations, which reduced the risk of costly tribunals by complying with anti-discriminatory legislation. ” www. lluk. org. uk/3167. htm As a manager working within the Health ;amp; Social Care Sector, I agree with the above statement, particularly creating a working environment in which everyone is encouraged to perform to their maximum potential. An inclusive organisation will ensure that their workforce are not excluded for any reason, either directly or indirectly, from partaking in a chosen programme. All the workforce will bring with them valuable skills, knowledge and experiences, I try to incorporate these within any training sessions and treat everyone as an individual.

I am always positive and proactive where equality and diversity are concerned, even if my opinions differ from those of my workforce. I have to challenge my own values and beliefs. However, as a professional, I am first and foremost a manager, and my personal opinions must not interfere with the employment process. I must also be careful not to indulge the minority to the detriment of the majority. 3. Be able to understand the needs of others in relation to equality of opportunity and diversity 3. 1 – Explain the requirement to understand individual’s needs, feeling and motivations and to take an interest in their concerns The fundamental reason for promoting equality is to meet the needs of the workforce.

Individuals are at the heart of the company and meeting their needs requires an active approach to equality of opportunity at all stages of their employment. It is about the removal of social and economic barriers to participation. Good equal opportunities ensure that all employees: * are respected and not discriminated against; * become aware of equality and inclusion; * benefit from high quality opportunities * work in an environment that supports their development. The Learning and Skills Council (LSC) look to employers and learning organisations they fund to help promote equality of opportunity, widen participation and improve performance.

They recommend the following. “Explicit references: equality of opportunity should be promoted and discrimination tacked so that all employees achieve their potential, * guidance and support should be sensitive to quality of opportunity, * organisations should have effective measures to eliminate oppressive behaviour, including all forms of harassment, * companies should be socially inclusive, ensuring equality of access and opportunities for workforces, * managers should use materials and methods that promote equality of opportunity, * there should be explicit aims, values and strategies promoting equality for all that are reflected in the organisation’s work. Implicit references: staff should have access to relevant, effective support on personal issues, * staff should understand their rights and responsibilities, * resources and accommodation should allow all staff to participate fully, * organisations should promote good working relationships, * programmes should be responsive to local circumstances, * the organisation’s values should be fully understood by staff, including sub contractors and work placement organisations, * the performance of different groups of staff should be used to guide programme development. As a manager I need to take positive steps to promote a culture of equality and diversity in everything that I do that may affect the employment process. 3. 2 – Evaluate the impact of showing respect to others, recognising their value and upholding their rights An example of showing respect to others, recognising their value and upholding their rights could be:

An employee has declared to me during this Common Induction Standards training that he is transgender and wants to know which toilet facilities he can use. He has not asked this information remain confidential. This declaration by the employee means that my whole organisation is deemed to know under the Equality Act 2010, and will need to make reasonable adjustments so that the employee has access to toilet facilities he is comfortable with. I may suggest that the employee can use the disabled toilet which is accessed by both males and females. If I am unable to respond to the employee’s needs, he may feel that under the Gender Reassignment Regulations (1999) his needs have not been given the same consideration as those of male and female gender.

Some employees may not want to may not want to complete the section on the application form (pre 2008), which required them to disclose details such as a disability, ethnic origin, date of birth etc. Although it was not compulsory, the information often helped our organisation support the workforce, as well as collect data for purposes such as funding and statistics to inform policies. 3. 3 – Describe the need for integrity, fairness and consistency in dealings with individuals When considering forms of harassment, it is important to bear in mind that different people have different cultural and social perceptions as to what they consider to be hostile or degrading. If possible, deliver sessions with your workforce to try to address these perceptions or assumptions.

During the recruitment and selection process, I often ask the interviewers what they understand by equality and diversity and how they ensure it in their interviewing. Very often the response is that they would treat everyone the same. However, diversity, fairness and equality are about treating others as they would wish to be treated, rather than making assumptions on their behalf. The workforce is all different and therefore have different needs and different degrees of need which will lead to equal outcomes at the end of their training. Language has a fundamental role to play in treating people fairly. Words you use should give a clear message to all the workforce that myself and my organisation value diversity and respect individual differences.

Carefully examining the language I use and the way I use it will help ensure that I treat my workforce as individuals and not merely as members of staff. Communication is not just about words, however, and I also should ensure that my tone of voice, demeanour and body language convey the same message of inclusiveness. An example may be: Gemma has been asked to plan, design and deliver a four week Job Skills programme as part of a Support and Achieve Programme for Lone Parents. The clients are referred to the programme from JobCentrePlus and the aim of the project is for the one parents to return to work. The very title of this project typecasts these clients into a particular group. They are immediately identified as lone or single parents. Gemma therefore suggests the title be changed.

Reports from the media project an image of lone parents as predominately young mothers or fathers with children living on their own and claiming state benefits. There are many diverse people who find themselves as lone parents due to different circumstances, for example, widows, windowers or divorcees. The title of a programme can therefore affect who will apply for it, in this example it is positive discrimination in favour of lone parents. However, the content will be based around returning to work and could easily be adapted to suit others, and the mix of workers will help promote inclusion and equality. 3. 4 – Outline a process for dealing with others whose behaviours, words or actions do not support a commitment to equality of opportunity or diversity

When an inspection is planned, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) uses the provider’s annual self-assessment report, along with other information such as data on achievement and development plans. Inspection reports include judgements on self-assessment and the self-assessment report. During the inspection the self-assessment report will continue to provide CQC inspectors with crucial evidence to support judgements about the Essential Standards of Quality and Safety’s main aspects, the contributory grades for equality and diversity, safeguarding and the provider’s capacity to improve. Inspectors will use the report to assess risk, monitor standards and plan for inspection. Where subject areas are to be inspected, the report will help the lead inspector select the areas to inspect.

Findings during the inspection will be compared with those in the self-assessment report, and a conclusion reached on the accuracy of those judgements. Judgements on the accuracy and use made of the self-assessment report contribute to the grade awarded for the provider’s capacity to make and sustain improvements. A provider that is judged to be outstanding in this area will have a self-assessment report that is highly accurate. The process of self-assessment will be comprehensive and inclusive. It will be used very effectively to secure sustained improvements in all aspects of the provider’s work. A provider that is judged to be good in this area will have a self-assessment report that is largely accurate.

The process will be thorough and used well to secure improvements in most aspects of the provider’s work. A provider that is judged to be satisfactory in this area will use self-assessment well to identify most of the provider’s strengths and weaknesses and bring about improvements. A provider judged to be inadequate in this area may be one where quality improvement and self-assessment do not lead to demonstrable improvements. After inspection you must review and update your plans to take account of the inspection findings. Providers are required to set out clearly what actions are needed and to link this explicitly to the inspection findings within two months of the publication of the inspection report.