Math;multiplication quiz

If for example the digits | |drawn are 3,6,1 and 2, create a multiplication quiz such as 36 X 12 and ask if any of the students knows how to solve it. Some students may have an idea of how| |to solve it. At this point, some students may know the algorithm but might not have knowledge of the Place Value. | |Tell students that the objective of this class is multiplying two-digit numbers and understanding Place Value in the computation of integers. | |Tell the students what the numerals in the two-digit numbers (36 and 12) represent: 3 and 1 represent tens, while 6 and 2 represent ones. | |Demonstrate how a two-digit multiplication is carried out by multiplying ones times ones, then ones times tens and then adding the products.

For example; | | | | | |3 | |6 | | | |x | |1 | |2 | | | | | |7 | |2 | | |3 | |6 | |  | | | |4 | |3 | |2 | | | | | | | |Teacher Modeling | |The teacher will repeat a few examples and ask volunteers to explain | |The teacher will then write three simple quizzes and two relatively complex quizzes in the chart. Every student should correctly do the simple quizzes while the| |complex quizzes will be done in groups. | | | | | | | | |Quizzes to be done individually: | | | |3 | |6 | | | | | |4 | |7 | | | | | |5 | |0 | | |x | |1 | |2 | | | |x | |1 | |2 | | | |x | |1 | |2 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |Quizzes to be in groups: | | | |3 | |6 | | | | | |4 |7 | | | |x | |4 | |7 | | | |x | |5 | |0 | | | | | | | |Children’s Literature Selection | |McElligot, Matthew. (2009). The Lion’s Share.

London: A & C Black | |The teacher will reread the book, this time going through each multiplication contained in the story in detail. Occassionally, the teacher might substitute the | |figures in the table with new figures to gauge the understanding of regrouping by the students. | |Guided Student Practice: | |The student will be provided with pencils and papers on which to perform their computations. Groups that have parformed well will be required to assist groups | |that are lagging behind. | |Independent Student Practice: Students who grasp concepts faster are assigned even more challenging/ complex quizzes. Students lagging behind attended to | |individually by the teacher. |Closure: “In today’s class we have been taught how to multiply two-digit numbers and have learnt, Value Place and regrouping of ones, tens, hundreds and | |thousands. ” Students who have successfully completed quiz visit the site www. multiplication. com/games and play interactactive multiplication games to reinforce | |knowledge acquisition. | |

Summative Assessment: | |Students assigned homework of 5 relatively more complex multiplication if they successfully completed class assignments. Students correct areas they have done | |wrongly in class assignments using conspicuous markers. | |LESSON REFLECTION | |Describe the outcome of the lesson. | | |There was an apparent understanding of the two-digit multiplication concepts; regrouping of ones into tens and tens into hundreds. | |Describe student performance and state the number of students who achieved the objective on the pre-test and the post-test (Summative Assessment). | | | |Pre-Test: Majority of the students successfully completed the pre-test assignments (13 out of 16). | | | |Post Test: 2 students (out of the three who could not complete the pre-test) scored 2 out of 5 in the class assignment; 1 student got 3 out of 5; 4 scored 4 out| |of 5; and 9 students got everything correct. |Describe an alternative approach for this lesson | | | |For the three students who failed to meet the target, ‘refresher’ lessons in multiplication concepts might be required. This might involve a closer one-to-one | |sessions with the underperforming students | |Describe an appropriate lesson to follow this lesson. | | | |Regrouping during multiplication of numbers with decimals | DO NOT ASSIGN HOMEWORK unless the students demonstrate mastery. The parents are important in the lives of their children, but YOU are the teacher.