repetition and rhymes

Alabama” uses literary techniques such as symbolism, repetition and rhyme to express the journey being undertaken by Skynard. Each of these texts explore the notion that it is the journey, not the desitination that is important. The use of symbolism in Rabbit Proof Fence is used to explore the concept that the journey not the distination matters. Symbolism is the use of one object to represent a notion or other object. The inclusion of the spirit bird in the story explores the importance of religion to the girls and the importance of the journey.

As mentiioined in an aearlier scene, the spirit bird appears (over the exhausted Molly and Gracie) and awakens them from their sleep. This is used to refer to hope and provides in indication that they will make it home, and will have spiritually benefited from their journey. The use of symbolism lends to the notion that it is indeed the journey, not the destination that matters. Different lighting techniques enable the notion of the journey being the thing that matters to be convery to the viewer.

Lighting specific to the mood is used to infer location, time and the changing nature of the journey. The harsh brightness throughout the journey is a portrayal of the unforgiving locale and conditions needing to be overcome in order to reach the destination. The most relevant and important example of this being the pitch black used when the girls are reunited with Maud. This sued of darkness is used to imply the solemn nature of the arrival, and is accompanied by Molly’s statement “I lost one” which is indicativbe of the importance of the journey, rather than the final destination.

Camera angles are used by Noyce to explore the idea that it is the journey, not the destination that matters. The panning long shot of the horizon (used at the commencement of the journey, when the three girls escape Moore River) is used to express the long difficult task at hand, and that in order to arrive home, they must over come a harsh terrain and long journey. The use of such varying camera angles sis indicative that it is the actual journey that matters, as oppose to the final destination.

The “Rabbit Proof Fence” plays two vital roles throughout the journey of Molly, Daisy and Gracie, and is reflective of the importance of the journey. The fence is a representation of a map, as it is a symbol of home for the girls and provides a way in order for them to get home (following the fence). What is later revealed is that the fence has actually proven to be an obstacle, and that they have followed the wrong fence, and must change direction to get home.

The ability of the girls to overcome this hurdle, and arrive home is again indicative of the notion that it is the journey – not the destination – that matters when undertaking a physical journey. The growth of Molly throughout the film reflects on the importance of the journey rather than the final outcome achieved. Molly is established from the beginning of the film as a key character, but her growth throughout the journey serves to reaffirm and strengthen this notion.

We see her growth into a hunter, a supplier of food and water, and most importantly a maternal figure for her sister and cousin. This is most prominent in the arrival home, with her regretful statement, “I lost one” The physical journey undertaken enabled Molly to become more empowered, and provided a chance to hone the traditional skills of Aborigines, such as hunting, tracking and finding of water, and for this reason, the journey – not the destination – is what matters from a physical journey.