telephone support to customers

You are working at a support desk for a company providing onsite and telephone support to customers with Microsoft® PowerPoint® questions. On this particular day, you are presented with the following three situations: Situation 1: Susan, a pharmaceutical representative, must create a presentation about a new drug recently approved by the FDA. She wants to know the main functions of Microsoft® PowerPoint®. Susan’s gathered data includes graphs, videos, and statistics of the new drug. I would explain to her that the some of the main functions of PowerPoint are charting, drawing, inserting multimedia, outling, and word processing to name a few.

I would tell her that she could insert her videos of her research into her presentation. I would tell her that she could do this by clicking the insert tab and selecting the movie button and selecting movie from file. This will bring up a box where she can select the videos and advise her to select the file she wants to insert and select open. This will embed the video into the presentation. I would also explain to her the ways she can insert graphs into her presentation and that she can export the information from her Microsoft Excel spreadsheets if she wanted to.

I would walk her through the steps to inserting a graph by telling her to click on the insert tab and select chart. Than I would advise her to select the graph that best fits her information and MS Excel will open which she can than insert the information manually or from an existing spreadsheet. I would explain to her that Microsoft PowerPoint is an excellent tool for presenting statistics and information to large groups and even creating handouts. I would ask her if she had any other questions and also refer her to the Microsoft website where she can view tutorials and view information at her own leisure.

You are working at a support desk for a company providing onsite and telephone support to customers with Microsoft® PowerPoint® questions. On this particular day, you are presented with the following three situations: Situation 2: The training department from a local electronics store provides presentations to newly hired employees about the company and its operations. There are four different presentations created by four different people. The training supervisor wants to unify all four presentations into one without manually manipulating each slide.

I would explain to the training supervisor that this is possible with a few steps. I would advise the supervisor to save the presentations in a folder for easy access. I would explain to open a presentation and click on the last slide. I would explain to click on the home tab and select the new slide tab with the arrow which will open a dropdown box, at the bottom of this box you should select reuse slide which will open a box on the right hand side. I would advise them to click the browse button and select the presentation they would like to merge; this will open the slides in the box.

Before adding the slides to the current presentation it is very important to click the box at the bottom of the window that says “keep source formatting”. Once the box has been checked than you can right click on the first slide and select insert all slides. This will add all slides and keep the original formatting. I would advise to do this for each presentation they would like to add. I would ask if there were any further questions and answer them to the best of my ability. I would advise them that they could visit the website for tutorials and guides.

You are working at a support desk for a company providing onsite and telephone support to customers with Microsoft® PowerPoint® questions. On this particular day, you are presented with the following three situations: Situation 3: Tim, a college sophomore, is having trouble with a Microsoft® PowerPoint® presentation he e-mailed to himself from the library’s computer. When he executes the presentation, the slides change too fast, the font changes, and the audio from each transition does not match. Tim wants to know why this has happened and what can fix it.

I would advise Tim that this problem with the audio could be because the music files are not backed up on the computer it is being emailed to. I would suggest sending the music files separately to the computer. I would also suggest changing the slide transition speed to slow and apply it to all the slides and see if that fixes the problem. To do this I would tell Tim to click on the animation tab and select the slide transition dropdown menu and select slow and click apply to all. I would also suggest that it could be the size of the file that could be causing the problem and to reduce the size of the slide presentation.