Tourism in India

Ethically and morally this problem has to be solved if India has to move into the category of developed country and also as a place which provides medical care to both its own people and patients from other country The aim of this project is to put a finger on the highly profitable service of medical care combined with tourism in which India is currently considered as a market leader. It has been a known fact for past many decades that Indian doctors are highly skillful in their given field since all around the globe mot hospitals have doctors of Indian origin. Therefore it became almost natural that this trend extended to India.

This project also aims to show why India is attracting medical tourists, is it really a secure destination and how India can promote and develop this particular activity in the coming years so as face competition given by other Asian and African options. HISTORY Medical tourism is actually thousands of years old. In ancient Greece, pilgrims and patients came from all over the Mediterranean to the sanctuary of the healing god, Asklepios, at Epidaurus. In Roman Britain, patients took the waters at a shrine at Bath, a practice that continued for 2,000 years. From the 18th century wealthy Europeans traveled to spas from Germany to the Nile.

In the 21st century, relatively low-cost jet travel has taken the industry beyond the wealthy and desperate. The concept of medical tourism is not a new one. The first recorded instance of medical tourism dates back thousands of years to when Greek pilgrims traveled from all over the Mediterranean to the small territory in the Saronic Gulf called Epidauria. This territory was the sanctuary of the healing god Asclepius. Epidauria became the original travel destination for medical tourism. Spa towns and sanitariums may be considered an early form of medical tourism.

In eighteenth century England, for example, patients visited spas because they were places with supposedly health-giving mineral water streating diseases from gout to liver disorders and bronchitis. History of medical tourism in India includes all major aspects of health tourism, as medical tourism is an ancient practice in India. In India, medical tourism includes several health care and various complex surgical procedures such as cardiac surgery, cosmetic surgery, hip replacement or knee surgery and dental. In principle, the concept of medical tourism is not something new in India.

According to medical tourism in India, medical tourism is an ancient practice of tourism on the procedure for medical treatment and medical sites in India. As a cosmopolitan nation, India has a rich history of ayurveda and procedures for Ayurvedic treatment. The history of medical tourism in India also includes former Ayurvedic treatment in India and best destinations offer medical treatment in India. Medical tourism: A Global perspective & Competition Medical tourism happens when patients go to a different country for either urgent or elective medical procedures.

This phenomenon is fast becoming a worldwide, multibillion-dollar industry. The reasons patients travel for treatment vary. Many medical tourists from the United States are seeking treatment at a quarter or sometimes even a 10th of the cost at home. From Canada, it is often people who are frustrated by long waiting times. From Great Britain, the patient can’t wait for treatment by the National Health Service but also can’t afford to see a physician in private practice. For others, becoming a medical tourist is a chance to combine a tropical vacation with elective or plastic surgery.

And moreover patients are coming from poorer countries such as Bangladesh where treatment may not be available and going for surgery in European or western developed countries is expensive. The interesting thing of Medical tourism is that it is a concept which is actually thousands of years old. In ancient Greece, pilgrims and patients came from all over the Mediterranean to the sanctuary of the healing god, Aesculapius, at Epidaurus. In Roman Britain, patients took a dip in the waters at a shrine at Bath, a practice that continued for 2,000 years as it was believed that the waters had a healing property.