Was the sample random? How many brands were in the race? Were the brands ranked?

Was the sample random? How many brands were in the race? Were the brands ranked?

These are the unknowns based on the advertisement. The claim does not state what does #1 actually means. In comparison to what: price, size, or pleasant smell. Some numbers can be valid, but used in different ways such as the mean, median, mode and midrange. This is not the case for this ad because we do not have the data to either validate or disclaim this ad. This ad is misleading and lends its self to consumer’s impulse buying.

The consumer must be aware of such claims and do their research before buying products, items or food. 14. “How often do you run red lights? ” This question is a manipulating one because of how it is asked; it is a faulty survey question. It wants to know how often you run red lights and does not ask a yes or no question. The question forces you to select an answer among scripted choices identified by the surveyor. The answers would be: once a day, once a week, twice a week, or more than 3 times a week.

This is a bias question, especially if it does not offer an answer of “none” or “never”. The data collected can influence the amount of fines for running red lights, installing red light cameras, or have an effect on car insurance rates. This question does not take into account people without a driver license or people who take public transportation. It is all in how a question is asked because most surveys do not want a “yes” or “no” answer. They cannot perform the needed analysis to get an answer.

Some of the answers force people to choose the closest one that fits, but this causes bias and would not define the most accurate results. So the question and answers will steer the results toward what they want. The misuse of statistics should be against the law and the company or manufacturer should be held accountable for their misrepresentation. Also survey questions and answers should be more accurate and not bias. After going over this chapter it proves the saying “buyer beware” and do your own research. References Bluman, (2011), Mathematics in Our World